Decision Quality

Making good and timely decisions that keep the organization moving forward

Some make decisions quickly, some based on instinct, and some will decide only after thorough research and analysis. There are merits to all of these styles. However, the key to success at LII is to make decisions that balance speed and quality, instinct and analysis, and risk-taking and caution.

What keeps people from making good decisions? A common pitfall is overconfidence in their decision-making abilities. The truth is that no one has a perfect track record – especially when you look beyond whether a past decision was the “right one.” Was it timely, or was it delayed by “analysis paralysis?” Were the right people involved? Were dissenting views welcomed? At LII, the way we make decisions is as important as the outcome.

Decision Quality at LII

Here's what a group of LII leaders had to say about Decision Quality:

See the big picture.

Consider the short- and long-term impact of your decisions. Will solving your problem create one for someone else? Consider what’s best for the company and our customers.

See the big picture.

Consider the short- and long-term impact of your decisions. Will solving your problem create one for someone else? Consider what’s best for the company and our customers.

Whose decision is it?

Know who the decision maker is, who should be consulted, who should be informed, etc. Don’t delay or defer a decision that’s yours to make.

Whose decision is it?

Know who the decision maker is, who should be consulted, who should be informed, etc. Don’t delay or defer a decision that’s yours to make.

Balance timeliness and thoughtfulness.

If a decision needs to be made quickly, don’t spend a week overthinking it. When you have more time, gather the data and make a thoughtful decision.

Balance timeliness and thoughtfulness.

If a decision needs to be made quickly, don’t spend a week overthinking it. When you have more time, gather the data and make a thoughtful decision.

Have a contingency plan.

Understand the risks associated with your decision. Consider how much risk is acceptable. Plan for what might go wrong.

Have a contingency plan.

Understand the risks associated with your decision. Consider how much risk is acceptable. Plan for what might go wrong.

Use data appropriately.

Gather the right data to make an informed decision. Sometimes you won’t have all the information you need or the time gather it. You’ll have to do your best with what’s available.

Use data appropriately.

Gather the right data to make an informed decision. Sometimes you won’t have all the information you need or the time gather it. You’ll have to do your best with what’s available.

How can I apply Decision Quality at my level?

Decision Quality has slightly different characteristics based on your job level. Click the button for your level.

Seeks advice when unsure about choosing a course of action

Makes good routine decisions with coaching from others

Tests ideas with others before acting in new or unfamiliar situations

Uses rules and procedures to guide decisions and actions

You can download a list of all competencies for your job level on the Definitions By Job Level page.

Go to Definitions By Job Level

Demonstrates good judgment in routine, day-to-day decision making

Makes sound independent decisions in urgent and non-routine situations

Considers various inputs, criteria, and trade-offs to arrive at effective decisions and recommendations

Uses good judgment about whether to act independently or to escalate an issue

You can download a list of all competencies for your job level on the Definitions By Job Level page.

Go to Definitions By Job Level

Holds others accountable for making sound decisions that comply with policies and standards

Is willing to make tough decisions and move them forward, even if they are unpopular

Strikes the right balance between accepting workable solutions and pushing for better alternatives

Synthesizes information, experience, and various inputs to determine the best course of action

You can download a list of all competencies for your job level on the Definitions By Job Level page.

Go to Definitions By Job Level

Creates an environment that promotes cross-functional analysis and decision making

Holds leaders accountable to push decision making down to the most appropriate level

Requires that organization-level decisions be based on data and sound reasoning

Willingly makes tough decisions and difficult trade-offs on behalf of the organization

You can download a list of all competencies for your job level on the Definitions By Job Level page.

Go to Definitions By Job Level

Continue Your Learning

Visit the Development Resources page to find out how to learn more.
Go to Development Resources